Vaccinations in France.
Vaccinations in France. (C) Shutterstock

Dreaming of visiting France this summer? That rêve may soon be a reality for vaccinated travellers.

In an exclusive, much buzzed-about interview on the CBS News show “Face the Nation,” President Emmanuel Macron announced he’s finalising plans to allow vaccinated Europeans and Americans to visit France this summer. “We’re vaccinating more and more people,” the president explained, “with mid-May as the objective for 20 million, 30 million by mid-June, and by the end of the summer, all adults will be offered a vaccine.”

Starting in May, France will progressively lift restrictions, easing the third lockdown that went into effect before the Easter holiday weekend. Currently all schools and non-essential businesses are closed, and a nationwide curfew keeps citizens indoors from 7 pm to 6 am.

Travelling during covid.
Travelling during covid. (C) Unsplash

Though Americans have not been allowed to enter the European Union for nonessential reasons since March 2020, there’s now a light at the end of the tunnel. President Macron explained that the government is devising a way to welcome inoculated European and American citizens. He said, “we are working hard to propose a very concrete solution, especially for U.S. citizens who are vaccinated, so with a special pass, I would say.”

Passport and tickets.
Passport and tickets. (C) Unsplash

Even as Macron expressed optimism in the interview, France was imposing tough new entry restrictions on travellers from countries where the pandemic is raging (Argentina, Chile, South Africa and Brazil), in order to stop the spread of contagious new variants.

Watch President Macron’s full “Face the Nation” interview below.

3 COMMENTS

  1. Thanks for a most informative article. We long to return to France–Paris in particular–so of course we’re keen to know when other non-European countries, will be allowed to enter the country. Not just Americans, but Australians and New Zealanders, both of which have dealt with the pandemic very efficiently and effectively, with the world’s lowest death rates from the virus. The vaccination programs in both these countries is rolling out well, and there will be a very high uptake–Aust. and NZ have historically very high levels of vaccination uptakes, and the wisdom of that attitude is now plain to see with the COVID vaccination program–we’ll do whatever it takes to avoid another lockdown and allow freedom of movement, as well as the good health of the community. The other issue though is that it’s not just a case of the situation regarding our desired travel destination, but also whether, upon our return home, we won’t be forced into mandatory quarantine (currently, it’s 14 days in an authorised facility that’s under police or military supervision). That scenario will certainly influence the decision to travel. Let’s hope we all return to some sort of normality sooner rather than later–the passport is gathering dust!
    Thanks again for a very good article–typical of what we’ve come to expect and enjoy from France Today online.
    Kind regards,
    Cheryl Brooks, Sydney

  2. Cheryl, your statement that the vaccination programmes in Australia and New Zealand is “rolling out well” is not correct. In fact the vaccination programmes in both countries have not really even begun, in any great numbers, at all. Just ask my parents living in New Zealand both turning 74 this year!

    Australia has recently abandoned even providing targets when the population will be vaccinated after continuously pushing the dates back over and over again.

    I’m of course very pleased that both countries have Covid-19 under control but it seems complacency has set in with vaccinations which ultimately is the only exit strategy available to the world.

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