©Sylvia Davis

When the universe scuppers your travel plans, just go on an armchair tour of the best of France! Spending more time at home also means that the things that usually demand our immediate attention fade to the background for a minute, leaving perhaps a little extra space to nourish our minds and spirits.

In a remarkable effort in support of the #culturecheznous initiative by the French Ministry of Culture, museums have prepared virtual visits to invite us through their doors, in anticipation of a future visit #IRL. You can enjoy special exhibitions, browse the permanent collections and even attend concerts. So make yourself a cup of your favourite drink, put your feet up and join us on this virtual tour de force of France’s most precious cultural treasures… and some of its lesser known jewels.

Louvre ©Sylvia Davis

Musée du Louvre

Millions of visitors flock to the mother of all museums every year, and with over half a million pieces in its collection, one visit is never enough. This virtual tour is a perfect tool to plan out what you want to see on your next trip… from the comfort of your couch.

Grand Palais

Aiming to keep in touch with the public in spite of the current imposed distancing, the Réunion des Musées Nationaux – Grand Palais, with the Musée de Luxembourg, offers daily online activities and content. There’s something for everyone.

Musee du 11 Conti

Dedicated to the know-how of the Paris Mint, 11 Conti Museum presents direct views of some of the workshops of the last factory in Paris, the manufacturing techniques and metals used, and the equipment used in its manufacture.
Take a virtual tour.

Musée Rodin
©Sylvia Davis

Musée Rodin

The Musée Rodin in Paris was opened in 1919, primarily dedicated to the works of the famous sculptor. Discover the main pieces of the collection, and his chef-d’œuvre Gates of Hell.

Musée de Cluny

The National Museum of the Middle Ages (Musée national du Moyen Âge), also known as Musée de Cluny, is home to one of the most important medieval arts and craft collections in the world.
Discover their collection in 3D.

Musée Bourdelle

Plunge into the preserved studio of sculptor Antoine Bourdelle to learn more about his work and technique.

Go on a 360° visit.

French culture comes to us #stayathome 
©Sylvia Davis

Musée des Confluences

The spectacular Musée des Confluences in Lyon traces back the story of mankind in an original cross-dialogue between all sciences, inviting us to better understand the world around us.
Take a look at some of these amazing exhibits.

Musee des Arts Décoratifs

The Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris aims to promote applied fine arts and develop links between industry and culture, creation and production, to “pursue the realization of the beautiful in the useful”.

Visit their collection

Centre Nationale du Costume de Scène

Celebrating the incredible design and craftsmanship applied to the performing arts, the Centre National du Costume de Scene, located in Moulins in central France, is dedicated to stage costumes and sets.

Discover some of its most famous exhibitions in this online archive.

La Piscine

La Piscine is a museum of art and industry, located in the city of Roubaix in northern France, built on the site of a former art deco public swimming pool.

The museum just made a fabulous virtual tour available on its website.

Cité de la Dentelle et de la Mode, Calais
©Sylvia Davis

Cité de la Dentelle et de la Mode

Ever wondered how lace is made? Located in Calais in the heart of an authentic 19th century lace factory, the Cité de la Dentelle et de la Mode invites us to discover the rich history and know-how pertaining to this delicate craft.

Discover the virtual exhibit

MAMC Saint-Etienne

The Musée d’Art Moderne et Contemporain de Saint-Etienne Métropole, near Lyon, prepared an online glimpse into one of its exhibitions and world-class collection of 20th century art.

Take a tour

The wonderful museums of Paris

Paris Musées

The organisation that represents 14 cultural institutions in Paris, including the Carnavalet Museum, Musée Galliera, the Liberation of Paris museum, are giving us unprecedented online access to the priceless collections.

Explore the collections

Musee de Beaux-Arts de Lyon

Housed in a former Benedictine abbey, with a sculpture garden in its peaceful cloisters, MBA Lyon’s amazing collection offers “a panoramic overview of the great civilizations and schools of artistic expression from antiquity to the present day”.

Go on virtual tour here

MuCEM Marseille

The Museum of European and Mediterranean Civilisations (MuCEM) in Marseille charts the historical and cultural cross-fertilisation in the Mediterranean basin through the centuries up to the present day.

Discover the main items of their surprising collection

La Manufacture de Sèvres

The Sévres porcelain manufacturer, one of the most renowned in the world, has been owned by the French crown or government since 1759.
Take a look at some of its treasures

Le Mobilier National

The Mobilier Nationale service groups together the Gobelins and Beauvais Manufactory, with a history going back to the Garde-Meuble de la Couronne, responsible for the administration of all furniture and objects in the royal residences.

Look at these amazing pieces!

Musée des Beaux Arts de Rouen

The Museum of Fine Arts in Rouen is home to one of the most prestigious public collections in France, bringing together paintings, sculptures, drawings and objets d’art from all schools, from the 15th century to the present day.

Catch a glimpse of the collection online

Museum of the Liberation of Paris
©Sylvia Davis

… and more!

There’s even more on the official #CultureChezNous page, updated frequently during the lockdown.

 

2 COMMENTS

  1. I have heard of a museum in Paris that specializes in door locks, hinges and other hardware. It seems that it is currently closed but I would love to visit it the next time I am in Paris. I am a professional locksmith and would love to plan my visit around that! I believe that it is in what was a Hotel and near the Picasso Museum if memory serves me right.
    Alternatively, a virtual tour by computer would be great, if they are no longer open to the public.

    Thank You,
    John Kraft

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