The stars at the Cesar awards
The stars at the Cesar awards, photo credit: Stéphane Vansteenkiste

There were many highlights at the Césars— the prestigious French film awards– held at the Théâtre du Châtelet last Friday here in Paris. From Dheepan to Fatima, the honoured films represented the diverse melting pot of French cinema today. Comedian Florence Foresti, the energetic host, pulled out all the stops to bring humour to the event that, like the Oscars, is often criticized for its length. There was a surprise performance by chanteuse Christine and the Queens, singing a cover of “It’s Only Mystery”, the theme song from Luc Besson’s 1985 film, Subway.

And then there was the perfect speech—in French—by Michael Douglas.

Mon discours en français est comme une audition. Si vous voulez tourner, pensez à moi!” He said when accepting his honorary Cesar, a lifetime achievement award. “Consider this an audition; if you want to film, think of me!” Douglas expressed his great respect for French cinema and the great directors and actors who inspired him from an early age (Lelouch, Truffaut, Malle and Godard… Jean-Paul Belmondo, Alain Delon and Jeanne Moreau). “That’s why this prize is so important to me. I’m receiving it in a country that gave birth to my idols, the country that gave birth to cinema.” He concluded with, “Thank you for your friendship all these years, for me, my family and the United States. Vive la France.”

Both Fatima and Mustang scored multiple awards, while Jacques Audiard’s Palme d’Or winner Dheepan did not.  To the great delight of the audience, Vincent Lindon finally clinched the Best Actor award for La Loi Du Marché, while Catherine Frot won for Best Actress in Marguerite. (The full list of awards is below.)

But perhaps the best part of the evening was the legendary after-party at Fouquet’s. After 1 am, the beau monde of French cinema sat down for a multi-course meal, elaborated by Pierre Gagnaire and Chef des Cuisines Jean-Yves Leuranguer, at this mythical spot between the Avenue George V and the Champs-Élysées. First opened in 1899, Fouquet’s is a listed historic monument which continues to exude glamour today. Dapper waiters poured the bubbly (Champagne Tsarine) and more than 700 diners savoured a sparkling soirée.

 

BEST FILM

Fatima, dir: Philippe Faucon

BEST ACTOR

Vincent Lindon, La Loi Du Marché

BEST DIRECTOR

Arnaud Desplechin, My Golden Days

BEST ACTRESS

Catherine Frot, Marguerite

BEST FOREIGN FILM

Birdman, dir: Alejandro G Inarritu

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

Deniz Gamze Ergüven, Alice Winocour, Mustang

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

Benoit Magimel, La Tête Haute

BEST ORIGINAL MUSIC

Warren Ellis, Mustang

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

Philippe Faucon, Fatima

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

Sidse Babett Knudsen, L’Hermine

BEST SET DECORATION

Martin Kurel, Marguerite

BEST FIRST FILM

Mustang, dir: Deniz Gamze Erguven

BEST DOCUMENTARY

Tomorrow, dirs: Cyril Dion, Mélanie Laurent

BEST EDITING

Mathilde Van De Moortel, Mustang

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

Christophe Offenstein, Valley Of Love

BEST SOUND

François Musy and Gabriel Hafner, Marguerite

BEST ANIMATED FILM

Le Petit Prince, dir: Mark Osborne

BEST ANIMATED SHORT

Le Repas Dominical, dir: Céline Devaux

BEST NEWCOMER (MALE)

Rod Paradot, La Tête Haute

BEST COSTUMES

Pierre-Jean Larroque, Marguerite

BEST SHORT FILM

La Contre Allée, dir: Cécile Ducrocq

BEST NEWCOMER (FEMALE)

Zita Hanrot, Fatima

(Visited 137 times, 1 visits today)
SHARE
Previous articleParis Concerts: Eddy Mitchell at the Palais des Sports
Next articleAn Exclusive Interview with Film Director Maïwenn
Mary Winston Nicklin
Based in Paris, Nicklin is the Web Editor of France Today. She is also the Editor of Bonjour Paris, the site's sister publication. As a freelance journalist, she has contributed to publications like The Washington Post, Condé Nast Traveler, Rhapsody, Travel Agent Magazine, Luxury Travel Advisor, Afar and USAToday.com.

NO COMMENTS

LEAVE A REPLY