In the Criminal-Catching Footsteps of Alphonse Bertillon

Described by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle himself as better than Sherlock Holmes, this Parisian petty clerk came to change the world of criminology. Chloe Govan explains why we should stop confusing him with a...

Say Cheese: The History of La Vache Qui Rit

It’s smiles all round for The Laughing Cow with a very interesting history indeed La Vache Qui Rit... Or, as it is known in the UK and across the pond, The Laughing Cow. Children adore...

Wealthy, Scandalous and Powerful: The Patrons of Paris

Marie-Laure de Noailles and Natalie Clifford Barney were both famed for their patronage of the arts but, as Lanie Goodman writes, even within the context of early 20th-century Paris, they were also notorious for...

Commemorating the Fallen: The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission has been toiling tirelessly in the shadows since the First World War. At long last, its incredible restoration work is being thrust into the spotlight at a new visitor...

Read the Signs: Rue de Rivoli, the Famous Street in Paris

The colonnaded storefronts lining one side of the rue de Rivoli attract shoppers; the Tuileries Gardens and Louvre Museum along the other provide quite the backdrop. There is so much to see on the three...

Christian Dior: In Memory of the New Look

His parents disapproved of his career choice. The Second World War interrupted it. And the crowds bayed for blood when he revealed his New Look. Chloe Govan reveals Christian Dior's roller-coaster ride to success "As...

Suzanne Valadon: Artist and Muse of Montmartre

A muse for the artists of Montmartre and a pioneer for female painters – and single mothers – around the world, she rose from humble beginnings to achieve fame and fortune. Hazel Smith traces...

The Queen of Champagne: The Legacy of The Widow Clicquot

Once upon a time, French monks would enter the cold, dark cellars of their monasteries, only to discover that their precious wine was destroyed. Unbeknownst to these winemakers, the cold temperatures created a second...

Of Girls and Gaulois: The Equality of Celtic Women in France

Long before Julius Caesar began his conquests, women held equal positions with men in the Celtic (or Gaulish) culture that spread over much of Europe. They excelled as leaders, warriors, scholars, artists, and inventors,...

A Taste of the Divine: Monks and Nuns Making Wine in France

Jennifer Ladonne steps into the mysterious world of the monks and nuns still making wine in France Though scientists debate whether it was the Etruscans or the Greeks who introduced wine and winemaking to France,...