The Train Stations of Paris, Reborn

Entering a Paris train station in 1846, you would have been as likely to meet an elegant bourgeois couple in rustling silks as a gun-slinging hunter and his baying hounds setting out for a weekend’s shooting in the countryside, such...
Le Barbe à Papa, Paris

Parisian Walkways: Rue Condorcet in South Pigalle

South Pigalle is the new go-to neighbourhood of Paris. Endearingly dubbed ‘SoPi’ by the foreign press (though the name has never really caught on with the locals), the area has seen slews of new boutiques, bars and restaurants set up...
The Rue de l’Abreuvoir in Montmartre

Parisian Walkways: Forgotten Montmartre

Once the haunt of supremely influential artists, Montmartre somehow manages to retain its Belle Époque allure.  On a sunny Sunday afternoon in 1876, Pierre-Auguste Renoir set up his easel at an open-air café on the top of the Butte...

Travel to Undiscovered France: 10 Secret French Islands

Even without taking its overseas territories into account, France has a number of interesting islands that are well worth venturing out to. Tristan Rutherford sets sail… Parisian Island: Île aux Cygnes Imagine a graceful tree-lined alley planted in the middle of...
Toile de Jouy

Made in France: La Toile de Jouy

The name toile de Jouy, now commonly used generically, stems from the village of Jouy-en-Josas, just south of Versailles, where the fabric was manufactured and where the Toile de Jouy Museum now perpetuates the story. The fabric has come...
Les Halles, Canopy

What’s New in Paris

It’s been said that nobody does culture better than France. French film, music, gastronomy, and art is exported around the world – soon the Louvre will even open a museum in Abu Dhabi – making culture a ‘soft...
Shoppers in the Galerie Véro-Dodat

Parisian Walkways: Galerie Véro-Dodat, An Historic Covered Passage

The passage couvert, these glass-roofed shopping arcades which flourished in early 19th-century Paris, owed their success in part to a promise inherent in their architecture – the capacity to transport their visitors to another place. In the 1800s, a passage...
Village of Castelnaud-la-Chapelle in the Dordogne

Dordogne Travels: The Lure of Périgord

La Dordogne: an ancient realm where dark rivers sweep under limestone cliffs and medieval hilltop villages emerge from lush dense forest; where a cornucopia of local produce has created a rich and abundant gastronomic heritage; where the extraordinary legacy of...
Julien, the brasserie

Parisian Walkways: Rue du Faubourg-Saint-Denis

This is contemporary Paris in a nutshell: ethnically diverse, increasingly gentrified and dedicated to the business of food, a vibrant microcosm condensed into the southern section of this very long street. Migrants and refugees from all over the world have...
A street sign on the rue du Chat-qui-Pêche

Read the Signs: Rue du Chat qui Pêche in Paris

The Rue du Chat qui Pêche, literally the street of the fishing cat, is not only notable for being the narrowest in Paris but also for an eerie ghost story. The street, perpendicular to Rue de la Huchette, gives on...